Life Recovery Step Five: Confess Your Shortcomings

Life Recovery Step FiveHas the pain from bad choices, habits, and decisions made life a prison? If so, it’s possible to break free from bondage—confession is the key!

Addictions and unhealthy patterns hold a person back from living a life of freedom that God designed for them to live. But when they see how their actions have hurt others and tell those whom they’ve hurt that they’re sorry, their life will transform for the better. And going through Life Recovery Step Five is the key to a person in recovery experiencing the relief their soul craves.

What is Life Recovery Step Five? Life Recovery Step Five states, “We admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.” (more…)

Life Recovery Step Four: Make an Inventory

Life Recovery Step FourWhy does the prospect of making an honest personal inventory, as Life Recovery Step Four states, scare most people?

When someone does a personal inventory, there’s an enormous amount of pain involved. Why? Because it’s painful for a person to come to terms with how they’ve harmed themselves and others. So, out of all the 12 Steps, Step Four is often one of the most challenging steps.

Life Recovery Step Four says, “We made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.”

It won’t be easy as a person takes stock of their life. (more…)

Life Recovery Step Three: Turn Your Life Over to God

Life Recovery Step ThreeFeeling disappointed? Have no hope? While no one knows what tomorrow will bring, God has a hope-filled future for the person who trusts Him.

Regardless of how challenging someone’s circumstances may seem right now—whether it’s addiction, hung up on an unhealthy habit, or pain from the past—it’s never too late to turn to God.

In Life Recovery Step Three, it says, “We made a decision to turn our wills and our lives over to the care of God.”

How? A person stuck in addiction lives life on their terms and for themselves. But when they decide to turn their will and life over to God, they will begin to find freedom from addiction. So instead of using willpower alone to overcome their struggles, they can use God’s power.

Bill Wilson, the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, said it best “Our whole problem had been the misuse of our willpower. (more…)

Life Recovery Step Two: Believe in a Power Greater Than Yourself

Life Recovery Step Two: Believe in a Power Greater Than YourselfJesus alone did what no one else could: He rose from the dead. And this is why Life Recovery Step Two says, “We came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.”

This same power that brought Jesus out from the grave is the same power that a person stuck in addiction can plug into and bring them to—and help them maintain—sobriety.

If the lamp is not plugged into an outlet, a lightbulb is of little value. Likewise, a person’s life will not shine to their family, friends, coworkers, and neighbors if not connected to God’s power source. It takes work, but the results are well worth it.

One way to plug into God’s power source is to connect to Him by talking to Him daily. This happens through a daily quiet time of prayer. But for the individual in recovery who has gotten away from this habit, it will be only a matter of time before they are tempted to use—which is always crouching around the corner—and fall prey to relapse. (more…)

Life Recovery Step One: Admit You Are Powerless

Life Recovery Step One: Admit You Are PowerlessCan the 12 Steps of Life Recovery help anyone? Yes, absolutely! The 12 Steps are especially beneficial for anyone whose life has become unmanageable (Isn’t that most people?).

So, where does someone start? The best place to start is by taking the first step. Life Recovery Step One says: “We admitted that we were powerless over our problems and that our lives had become unmanageable.” If someone wants to change their life, they must admit to themselves, God, and another person that they are powerless and that their lives have become unmanageable. To download all the 12 Steps, click here.

When individuals refuse to admit they are powerless, they’re only deceiving themselves. Yet, all the while, they are inching closer to disaster. The lies they tell themselves—and others—are all too familiar: (more…)

6 Principles for Healthy Confession

6 Principles for Healthy Confession

  1. Be sensitive.
    The one who is confessing should not overburden the listener. People suffering are self-absorbed; their pain keeps their attention focused on themselves, their problems, and their needs. They have difficulty thinking about anything else. But pain is not a license to inflict hurt on anyone else—especially someone who wants to help. Someone who agrees to help lead in recovery should have lives of their own, and the person who is confessing should not feel entitled to dump their troubles on them every time they feel the need.
  2. Be discreet. (more…)